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Firefox 5.0 is released; 5 exclusive flaws fixed

By Gina on June 23, 2011 | Computer Security, Firefox 5.0, computer security, Firefox Version 4.0, V5, V4, the latest security patches, vulnerabilities Firefox 5.0 is released; 5 exclusive flaws fixed

The new version of Firefox 5.0 was released on 22 June 2011. Note, that Firefox 4 was released just three month ago and had one update to Version 4.0.1.

It seems like the latest version of Firefox is a bit cloudy and not gives you clear view of what is new in it because even trust releases web page gets you as far as Version 4.0. For the Firefox 5.0 version for now you just may get few clues that it has a new look, super speed, and even more awesomeness.  

If you’ve already updated it and want to know what new features you have got, the main angle of Version 5.0 is support for the Do Not Track on multiple platforms. It also “includes more than 1,000 improvements and performance enhancements that make it easier to discover and use all of the innovative features in Firefox“.

However, with the new release of Firefox, you also get the latest security patches to Version 4.0.1. By updating Version 4.0.1 to 5.0 you’ll get five remote fixes of its vulnerabilities. Here are Version 5 critical fixes:

MFSA 2011-26
Multiple WebGL crashes
MFSA 2011-22 Integer overflow and arbitrary code execution
MFSA 2011-21 Memory corruption due to multipart/x-mixed-replace images
MFSA 2011-20 Use-after-free vulnerability when viewing XUL document with script disabled
MFSA 2011-19 Miscellaneous memory safety hazards

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